Centre for
Research in Culture and Communication


Centre for Research in Culture and Communication Seminars 2002

The Brandon Teena Archive

Judith Halberstam, Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies at University of California, San Diego
(author of the award winning Female Masculinity)

Function Centre, Murdoch University
Tuesday 9 April 10:30 - 12:00pm

The Centre for Research in Culture & Communication School of Media, Communication and Culture Murdoch University in association with the Australian Film Commission and FannyJ Productions invite you to a lecture/screening by Judith Halberstam Professor of Literary and Cultural Studies at University of California, San Diego.

This paper is less concerned with the details of the Brandon Teena case (the subject of the film Boys Don't Cry), which are by now well known, and more preoccupied with the development, over a relatively short period of time, of a massive archive of representations of the events and experiences associated with the name "Brandon Teena". By now, the life and death of Brandon Teena has been so thoroughly mythologized through novels, films, documentaries, plays and web sites that it offers a unique opportunity to analyse how and why certain stories, indeed certain lives, are selected for the work of queer memorialisation, why other lives and deaths are passed over and what historical shifts culminate in the extraordinary visibility of a particular case.

Judith Halberstam's books include Skin Shows: Gothic Horror and the Technology of Monsters; Posthuman Bodies; Female Masculinity; and The Drag King Book.


Centre for Research in Culture and Communication Seminars 2001
Some Observations on the Problems and Possibilities of Queer Theory

Seminar, 4.30pm, Tuesday 16 October 2001, Education/Humanities Common Room 2.21

If contemporary commentators on gender sexuality are to be believed, queer theory offers the apotheosis of liberty in sexual expression and reflection for free autonomous individual subjects - yet it also eludes definition or even the fixidity of conditional representation as a particular approach to or theorisation of sexuality. Have we found the Philosopher's Stone, or Stumbled onto Fools Gold? This lecture seeks to explore the principal constituents of queer theory and argue that its possibilities are conditional upon scepticism and realism as to the 'subjects of mind' that it inscribes.

Paul Reynolds is a Senior Lecturer in Politics and Sociology at Edge HIll College. Recent 'credits' include guest editor for an edition of the journal Contemporary Issues in Law on the subject of 'Rape and Sexual Consent' and co-editor of 'Making Sense of Sexual Consent' with Mark Cowling, due out in 2002. He has also recently co-edited a collection called Marxism, Millennium and Beyond with Mark Cowling and his most recent publication is a piece on 'Accounting for Sexuality' in Radical Statistics, discussing the failings of census in this area.


The Cultural Industries: Making Meaning, Making Money

Dr David Hesmondhalgh, Deputy Director of the Pavis Centre for Social and Cultural Research at The Open University, UK

Thursday 9 August 2001, 4.00 pm

Education and Humanities Common Room, EH 2.21

David Hesmondhalgh is author of The Cultural Industries (in press with SAGE Publications, due to be published February 2002); co-editor of Western Music and its Others (University of California Press, 2000)

Abstract

There has been much talk in recent years of the transformation of the cultural industries. But how much are the cultural industries really changing? Which approaches will best equip us to understand the role of creative workers in the business of making culture? David Hesmondhalgh addresses these issues in a wide-ranging discussion of contemporary debates about cultural production.


Narrative in Cultural Studies Research: The Indian Ocean

Professor Stephen Muecke

Public Lecture

Wednesday, May 9 2001

1.30-2.30 pm

Education and Humanities Lecture Theatre

When narrative theory was a cutting edge field in the structuralist seventies, it had a universalising function: it was something 'all cultures' had in common. This 'global currency' gave power to the analysis of particular texts, where singular cultural values could nonetheless emerge. What has happened now is that 'narrative' as a research tool has spread into fields like educational psychology and psychotherapy, while researchers in the humanities are debating the significance of, and trying their hand at, narrative as a writing style.Historians have been acutely aware of how they have 'story' in their professional name, and there are numerous modernist tropes (metaphor, montage, fragment) which make historical narrative less 'continuous' and objective and more literary and subjective.

Narrative remains, it is my argument, a powerful way of thinking. It is can be both a way of doing research, a method, and the object of our attention. Narratives-the way the world is 'scripted'-are the slowly changing objects against which criticism directs its intellectual forces.

How does this analysis play itself out in the 'ocean of story' that is the Indian Ocean? My colleagues and I will be investigating the trading of stories and stories of trade, from Sindbad to the video or satellite distribution of stories. If the area studies approach to the region has failed to disrupt, for the most part, the spice trade story of the heroics of European exploration and colonisation, and the impact of postcolonial thought has thus far been minimal, then our job in cultural studies will be to articulate theory to history in a region regaining some of its lost and 'fabulous' pre-colonial wealth and prestige.

Stephen Muecke is Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of Technology, Sydney and author of Textual Spaces (1992), Reading the Country (1996) and No Road (bitumen all the way) (1997). His research areas include Cultural studies; Aboriginal studies; Ficto-critical writing and the essay; Textual studies and Postcolonial studies. He is currently researching politics and culture in the Indian Ocean region. His work is situated at the intersection of Aboriginal and Islander Studies with Communication and Cultural Studies, embracing diverse topics such as philosophy, geographical perception, Australian social conditions, Australian Aborigines, race relations and cultural assimilation.


Assimilation and Modernism in Aboriginal Australia

Professor Stephen Muecke

Seminar

Thursday, May 10 2001

4.30 pm

EH2.21 (Education Common Room)

It is now commonplace to pluralise the modern in a reaction to a Eurocentric historicism in which 'stages of development' would proceed from Europe outwards. Assertions of these alternative modernities, or enlightenments, can be based on theses of co-existing and ancient civilisations, but the analysis rests paradoxically and heavily on the undying hegemony of Western theory, and even technology.

What might be involved in any indigenous claims to being modern (as opposed to 'traditional vs urban'; or 'until recently pre-modern')? Marshall Berman defines modernism as the aesthetic means by which an urban and literate class subject to the invasive forces of modernisation seeks to create a sense of being home in the modern city. This seems to leave out a lot of indigenous people in urban and rural frontier zones, subject to the invasive forces of modernisation and colonisation, who have nonetheless created their own ways of being modern. This discussion focuses on the innovative aesthetics of Boxer in the East Kimberley at the turn of the century, making additional references to the puzzling question of technological modernity as an index of civilisation.

Stephen Muecke is Professor of Cultural Studies at the University of Technology, Sydney and author of Textual Spaces (1992), Reading the Country (1996) and No Road (bitumen all the way) (1997). His research areas include Cultural studies; Aboriginal studies; Ficto-critical writing and the essay; Textual studies and Postcolonial studies. He is currently researching politics and culture in the Indian Ocean region. His work is situated at the intersection of Aboriginal and Islander Studies with Communication and Cultural Studies, embracing diverse topics such as philosophy, geographical perception, Australian social conditions, Australian Aborigines, race relations and cultural assimilation.


Centre for Research in Culture and Communication Seminar

Terry Flew, Faculty of Creative Industries, Queensland University of Technology

Friday 29 June 2001, 2.00pm, EH 4.78 (Murdoch University)

THE CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF CREATIVITY

This presentation will begin by exploring a paradox of the global knowledge-based economy, where the capability for a more decentralised and 'spaceless' location of productive activity in the context of broadband networks has been countered by a stronger tendency for those involved in creative industries activity to cluster around particular geographical locations. The relationship between creative industries development and the emergence of particular locales of creativity, or creative milieux, and the role that can be played by public policy in the incubation of such sites, will be explored in this presentation. It will draw upon case studies in industries such as interactive games and popular music, as well as the ways in which a renewed focus upon creativity in convergent media environments, or a shift in focus from bandwidth and connectivity to creative content, is informing policy-makers in countries such as Singapore, Malaysia and China, and the ways in which creative industries development may occur in Australian cities and regions.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER

Terry Flew is a Senior Lecturer in Media Communication in the Creative Industries Faculty at the Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Australia. He is the author of several research monographs, book chapters and academic journal articles in the areas of media policy, media industries, broadcast media and citizenship, media and cultural diversity, new media technologies, and the impact of convergent media on higher education. He is currently completing New Media Technologies: An Introduction, to be published by Oxford University Press in 2002. He is also Research Development Co-ordinator in the Creative Industries Research and Applications Centre (CIRAC) at the Queensland University of Technology.


Convenor: Mark Gibson

School of Media Communication and Culture
Murdoch University
South Street, Murdoch
Western Australia 6150

Director, Centre for Research in Culture & Communication

Secretary, Cultural Studies Association of Australia

tel: 61-8-9360 2951
fax: 61-8-9360 6570


Centre for Research in Culture and Communication Seminars 2000
MURDOCH UNIVERSITY
Wednesdays 4.00-5.30pm
EH 4.78

All interested welcome to attend

Convenor: Mark Gibson

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22 March 2000 Martin Mhando

"Narrating the Southern African 'Nation' in After the Wax"

5 April 2000 Alan McKee (Visiting Speaker, Edith Cowan University)

"Does size matter? The politics of penises"

12 April 2000 Seal Savane

"Representing the Silenced" (East Timor)

19 April 2000 Jane Stadler

"Losing the Plot: Narrative and Identity in Lost Highway"

26 April 2000 John Richardson

"Double Vision is but Perfect Vision"

10 May 2000 Mark Gibson

"Why I am not a Foucauldian"

17 May 2000 Wendy Keys (Visiting Speaker, Australian Key Centre for Cultural and Media Policy, Griffith University, Brisbane)

"Television, Childhood and Media Policy in Australia"

Wendy Keys is an academic in the School of Film, Media, and Cultural Studies, Griffith University and represents Griffith on Arts Training Queensland's Film, Television and Video Industry Standing Committee. She is also the recipient of an Australian Post Graduate Award Industry APA(I) scholarship and is currently conducting doctoral research into the Australian children's television industry. The industry partners in this research program are the Seven Network, the Australian Broadcasting Authority (ABA), and the Department of Communication, Information Technology and the Arts (DCITA).

Abstract:

There is a strong argument in Australia for continuing to regulate television to ensure the provision of minimum levels of children's programs and Australian content. The focus in Australia therefore is not on whether to regulate or not but rather on how to regulate.

Within the context of the children's television industry, how should policy and regulation be re-shaped to fit the changing broadcasting environment and the changing position of Australian children in their local and global identities?

This presentation will draw on data from my doctoral research into the Australian children's television industry and will be structured around the following four headings: 1.Children and the Child Audience in Australia, 2. Regulating Content and Children's Television in Australia, 3. Cultural Diversity in a Global Broadcasting Environment, 4. Research and Policy.

24 May 2000 Wendy Parkins

"The Spiritual Everyday"